Infertility And Depression

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Infertility Depression

Posted by The MAB Team on 10/26/2011 to Fertility
Depression is not uncommon for couples trying to conceive when pregnancy is not immediately successful. When facing months of negative pregnancy tests, the frustration of hopeful parents can build to unmanageable proportions. And yet, the emotions associated with infertility depression are not limited to simply frustration or sadness; when suffering from infertility depression, both women and men can face feelings of jealousy, anger and grief.

Couples may also feel guilt over their negative feelings towards friends’ or family members’ successful conceptions. When facing infertility, trying to be happy for other couples that have conceived or just given birth can lead to overwhelming and bitter feelings of jealousy. Obsession may also become a factor, and negative emotions surrounding infertility may soon plague every aspect of the day.

More frequently, doctors are now incorporating depression support for women undergoing fertility treatment. Women seeking fertility treatment are encouraged to see licensed therapists to address the emotional aspects of infertility. Dealing with the emotions involved in fertility treatment is very important for the success of the program, and alleviating the stress of infertility can heighten a woman’s chance of conceiving. Finding ways to address and deal with the negative emotions involved with infertility, whether through therapy, acupuncture, or yoga, can have wonderfully positive results.

Stress management is also crucial for the sake of marriage preservation during fertility treatments. With specified injection times, a limited social life, and a specific sex routine to follow, couples tend to become distant and isolated from one another, and this can increase the already present depression and frustration.

If you are dealing with infertility and feel constantly distracted, have trouble functioning, find yourself withdrawing from family and friends, or have repeated bouts of crying, difficulty getting out of bed, or frequent arguments with your spouse, you may be showing signs of infertility depression and should seek the appropriate help.

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