What Is Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder?

Shopping Bag

0 item(s) in cart/ total: CA$0    view cart

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Posted by The MAB Team on 5/12/2011 to Health Topics
We are all told time and time again not to drink during pregnancy, but according to Health Canada around 9 out of every 1000 infants are born with FASD.  An estimated 300, 000 Canadians or 1% of our population.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) may result in several growth, mental, and physical problems.  Using or abusing alcohol during pregnancy poses the same risks to you.  When a pregnant woman ingests alcohol during pregnancy it passes across the placenta, straight to the baby. 

There is no safe number or amount of alcohol that is acceptable to consume during pregnancy.  It is clear however that binge drinking is far more harmful.  It is also suggested that alcohol seems to be the most damaging in the first three months of pregnancy. 

Various symptoms of FASD include poor growth in the womb, decreased muscle tone, poor co ordination, delayed development, heart defects, there is also a number of visible signs of FASD.  Structural problems of the face, narrow eyes, small head, small upper jaw, smooth groove and thin upper lip.  The effects of FASD are permanent, life long effects that are 100% avoidable.

If you are a woman suffering from alcoholism and found out your pregnant, now is the time to receive help.  There are several programs available to aid in the recovery of alcoholism.  

Add Comment